Tuesday, April 23

Tag: TESS

TESS Ultrahot offers new insights into the world
Science

TESS Ultrahot offers new insights into the world

Measurements from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) have empowered space experts to incredibly improve their comprehension of the peculiar condition of KELT-9 b, perhaps the most hottest planet known. "The weirdness factor is high with KELT-9 b," said John Ahlers, a cosmologist at Universities Space Research Association in Columbia, Maryland, and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. "It's a giant planet in a very close, nearly polar orbit around a rapidly rotating star, and these features complicate our ability to understand the star and its effects on the planet." The new discoveries show up in a paper drove by Ahlers distributed on June 5 in The Astronomical Journal. Situated around 670 light-years away in the group of stars Cygnus, KELT-9 b was...
NASA’s TESS spacecraft finds its littlest exoplanet to date
Science

NASA’s TESS spacecraft finds its littlest exoplanet to date

NASA's TESS spacecraft is proceeding to discover ever-littler planets - and that presently incorporates planets littler than the human homeworld. The vessel has discovered a planet in the L 98-59 system, L 98-59b, that is 80 percent the size of Earth - and 10 percent littler than TESS' past most tiniest finding. People won't planning a vacation at any point in the near future, lamentably. The system is 34.6 light-years away, and the majority of the planets found up until now (there are bigger 59c and 59d planets) sit in the "Venus zone" where a runaway greenhouse gas effect could render them uninhabitable. TESS detected the planets by utilizing transits (regular dips in the star's splendor brought about by passing planets). People may get more data soon, in any event. TESS finishes i...